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Mark Your Calendars! September 8-11, 2016
Shepherd Workshops

Saturday – Sunday                                                                      Registration not required

 EAST EXHIBIT BUILDING

SATURDAY

9:00 a.m.         Complementary Forage Systems for Lamb Production
A pasture rotation plan that utilizes brassicas and warm season annuals, short term perennials (red clover, chicory and ryegrass) and perennial pasture in comparison to a perennial-only pasture plan evaluating lamb weight gain potential per acre for each system.  Will a complementary forage pasture rotation plan meet the needs of highly productive sheep better than traditional perennial pastures. Richard Ehrhardt, Ph.D.Small Ruminant Extension Specialist, Departments of Animal Science and Large Animal Clinical Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.

10:00 a.m.       Managing Large Litters of Lambs
Extra lambs can be a challenge at times. Bob Leder, DVM, Producer, Bear Creek, WI, offers some strategies and practices to make raising these lambs easier. The right gestational nutrition and lambing season practices can improve lamb performance and your profit margin.

11:00 p.m.       Non-traditional Ethnic Lamb Markets
The importance of the non-traditional lamb market in the upper-Midwest and appropriate management systems to target this market, along with market preferences for various components of this broad market. Richard Ehrhardt, Ph.D.Small Ruminant Extension Specialist, Departments of Animal Science and Large Animal Clinical Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.

1:00 p.m.         Nutritional Management to Improve Reproductive Efficiency in Sheep
How improved pre breeding nutrition in both fall and spring breeding is a sound investment to improve flock productivity. I will also discuss optimal feeding programs for ewe lamb development and provide growth targets and the rationale for them. Richard Ehrhardt, Ph.D.Small Ruminant Extension Specialist, Departments of Animal Science and Large Animal Clinical Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.

2:00                 Wants, Wages, and Woes: Owning A Stock Dog
Wants: A realistic approach to what you want out of a dog and setting your expectations. Wages: The true cost of a dog is just a fraction of the total value. Woes: Expectations from ownership of a stock dog, what you’ve done right and where you might be going wrong.  Bring your current problems and concerns and maybe we can help fix them. (Advice is free.) Steve Riddle, Worden, IL has been training, trialing and offering demonstrations for 20+ years and there is always something new to learn.

3:00 p.m.         Out of Season Lamb Production
How the seasonality of lamb production hurts the industry and the opportunities and constraints to creating year-round production. Richard Ehrhardt, Ph.D.Small Ruminant Extension Specialist, Departments of Animal Science and Large Animal Clinical Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.
           

SUNDAY

9:00 a.m.         Know Your Internal Parasites – Understanding Fecal Floats
Internal parasites cause slow growth, diarrhea, anemia and potentially death. Fecal exams are most effective when run on individual animals, but cost often makes these important tests prohibitive. Correct parasite identification is key to avoid unnecessary worming and wormer resistance. For a small investment in materials producers can learn to successfully run fecal exams. Learn how to collect fecal samples for best results, several methods of running fecal floats, how to differentiate parasite ova (eggs) from debris, to identify internal parasites commonly affecting small ruminants in Wisconsin, when and why to choose chemical wormers and get an overview of the basics of a compound microscope. Eric Solis, Veterinary Technician Student, Madison College; Emancipation Acres Farm, Stoughton, WI. Two-hour lab

11:00 a.m.       What’s Your Farm’s Future?
Do you have a plan for your farm? The process of passing a farm from one generation to the next can be a very emotional and personal process for any farm business to go through. Farm succession blends the hard facts of financial feasibility, taxes, and business entities with the emotional concepts of loss of identity, fair vs. equal inheritance issues and facing one's parents' or one’s own mortality. This session will provide an overview of the components of a succession plan and the steps to get started. It will also offer some of the technical details of business structures to consider and the basic tax consequences of selling, gifting or passing assets at death. Joy Kirkpatrick, Outreach Specialist, UW Center for Dairy Profitability, Madison, WI. One and half hour workshop

 

 
 
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